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Les inventions XIX siècle December 5, 2005

Posted by Iglika in Développement des technologies, Révoluion industrielle.
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The prosperity of the Victorian age was built on a period of rapid economic growth that had its roots in the Industrial Revolution. Christine MacLeod traces its development and shows that the process owes as much to evolution as revolution. When Queen Victoria opened the Great Exhibition on 1st May 1851, her country was the world’s leading industrial power, producing more than half its iron, coal and cotton cloth. The Crystal Palace itself was a triumph of pre-fabricated mass production in iron and glass.

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Britain’s industrial evolution December 3, 2005

Posted by Iglika in Révoluion industrielle.
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Already in the 16th century agriculture’s demand for more land was putting pressure on Britain’s depleted woodlands. The rising price of wood as an industrial fuel made coal, with which Britain was plentifully supplied, an increasingly attractive option. Londoners had long been burning coal at home – a large coastal fleet shipped it down from the mines of Tyneside. Extending its use into industry, however, necessitated the containment of harmful fumes that contaminated the raw materials.

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La révolution industrielle au XIXème siècle November 26, 2005

Posted by Iglika in Révoluion industrielle.
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Britain was perhaps never the “workshop of the world,” but her industrial dominance was such in the middle of the nineteenth century that the phrase is legitimate. She produced perhaps two thirds of the world’s coal, perhaps half its iron, five sevenths of its small supply of steel, about half of such cotton cloth as was produced on a commercial scale, and forty per cent (in value) of its hardware.

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